Bangour Village hospital Part one





Bangour Village Hospital was a psychiatric hospital located west of Dechmont in West Lothian, Scotland. It was officially opened in October 1906 (under the name Edinburgh District Asylum), over two years after the first patients were admitted in June 1904. In 1918 Bangour General Hospital was created in the grounds, but the hospital began winding down in 1989 with services being transferred to the newly built St. John’s Hospital in the Howden area of Livingston. The final ward at Bangour eventually closed in 2004.

The hospital was modelled on the example of the Alt-Scherbitz asylum of the 1870s, at Schkeuditz, Germany, and represents one of the first village-plan psychiatric hospitals in Scotland. The Bangour institution comprised individual villas which would house approximately 30 patients each. The village also incorporated its own railway connection, a farm, bakery, workshops, recreation hall, school, shop, library and, latterly, a multi-denominational church.

The hospital was requisitioned by the War Office during both wars when it became the “Edinburgh War Hospital” and “The Scottish Emergency Medical Hospital”, reverting to a psychiatric hospital between the wars and after 1945. During the Second World War the patients were evacuated to Hartwoodhill Hospital.

The number of patients rose to over 3,000 in 1918. Temporary marquees and prefabricated huts were erected to cope with the demand for bed space, for both patients and staff. This led to the creation of Bangour General Hospital in the surrounding grounds, which was to become noted in many medical fields, in particular its burns and plastic surgery unit which was established in 1940.It also had a 1st class Maternity Unit serving the whole of the county.

In 1989, St John’s Hospital opened in nearby Livingston, and services were transferred from Bangour General Hospital, which closed in the early 1990s. The Village Hospital also started to wind down after the opening of St Johns, with the last remaining ward closing in 2004.

The hospital site comprises numerous buildings and structures, including 13 category A listed buildings. The villas were set within landscaped grounds, and are built in a 17th-century Scottish Renaissance style, with numerous individual variations. At the centre of the site is an Edwardian Baroque hall, and a Romanesque style church, which was built 1924-1930.

When the hospital was built, road access was poor, and considerable volumes of coal and general stores were required for the running of the facility. A private railway line was built, branching from the former Edinburgh and Bathgate Railway line at Uphall. It was authorised by the Edinburgh and District Lunacy Board Act of 30 July 1900, and it was opened to passengers on 19 June 1905. It may have been used before that date in connection with construction of the hospital.

The North British Railway operated the line, but the Bangour station was considered private. However, there was an intermediate station at Dechmont, which was open to the public generally, and was much used by staff at the hospital who lived at Dechmont.

During World War I the road network was improved, and the railway became unnecessary; it was closed on 1 August 1921, although passenger services probably ceased on 4 May 1921

The closed hospital was used as a filming location for the 2005 film The Jacket, starring Keira Knightley and Adrien Brody.

During September 2009, the hospital grounds were used as the site for “Exercise Green Gate”, a counter-terrorist exercise run by the Scottish Government to test de-contamination procedures in the event of a nuclear, chemical or biological incident. This involved 250 volunteer “casualties” and 400 emergency staff.

On 1 October 2015 Planning Permission for a residential and mixed use redevelopment of the former hospital site is being sought. The application notes some of the listed buildings at the site may be proposed for full demolition in a subsequent application. This may include villas 7,8,9 and 21, with other buildings potentially proposed for partial demolition.

My first visit to Bangour Village Hospital. No luck with getting inside as security are constantly following you. I hope this video is part one. I am currently awaiting permission to access some buildings which are safe before the site undergoes development with the new owner.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



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Bangour Village hospital Part one

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