Craigmillar castle in Edinburgh Scotland part:1 this video is 19 minutes.





Hi everyone thank you very much for watching really appreciated
your continued support i hope everyone is ok. here is more information about the castle hope you enjoy thank you for reading
take care stay safe love you all. xox

Craigmillar Castle lies just three miles south east of the centre of Edinburgh. Yet while the city features in the distant views from the castle’s walls, step inside them and you could be in a different time and place. Craigmillar Castle is simply one of the most completely preserved medieval castles in Scotland.

Craigmillar began life as the tower house that still forms the core of the castle. This was constructed around 1400, probably by Sir George Preston, one of a line of Prestons who played a large part in civic life in Edinburgh over several hundred years.

It was his grandson Sir William Preston who, in the 1440s, was responsible for Craigmillar’s most notable feature. He added the curtain wall that surrounds the tower house on three sides and creates the inner courtyard. In about 1510 Sir Simon Preston added a further layer of enclosure, erecting outer walls to form the outer yard and east and west gardens.

Craigmillar Castle was captured by the English in May 1544 with its laird (another) Sir Simon Preston, who was also Provost of Edinburgh at the time. A programme of rebuilding in the 1550s included the construction of a new range of buildings along the east side of the inner courtyard. This was designed to provide more modern and spacious accommodation than was available in the tower house.

It was probably in this new east range that Mary Queen of Scots stayed in September 1563 and again in December 1566. It was during her second stay that conspirators agreed the “Craigmillar Bond”: the plot to kill Mary’s dissolute husband Lord Darnley.

In 1660 the Prestons sold Craigmillar Castle to Sir John Gilmour. Craigmillar saw another round of building, this time leading to the creation of the west range. In the early 1700s the Gilmours did what other landed families across Scotland were doing at the same time. Rather than trying to convert their castle into a residence suitable for Edinburgh high society of the day they abandoned it. They moved instead to Inch House, newly built in what later became Gilmerton, named after the family.

Craigmillar Castle became overgrown and ruinous over the following two centuries, and was passed into state care in 1949. Today it is cared for by Historic Environment Scotland.

What makes Craigmillar special is the extent to which its underlying structure survives. The inner courtyard may now be home to two very impressive trees that were certainly not there in the Prestons’ time in the castle. But the walls of almost all the structures of the castle survive, together with all the vaulted floors. This means access is possible up to roof level in the tower house and first floor level in large parts of the rest of the building. There is also a complete wall walk around two sides of the curtain wall.
A bit more of queen Mary…
Mary spent reasonably lengthy periods at the castle – in 1563, she spent weeks recuperating from a tour of the South West of Scotland, which had been engineered to shore-up her support.

In 1566, she fled to safety in the castle after the murder of her close private secretary, David Rizzio. It’s clear that she had her own private quarters in the castle, although it’s not abundantly clear where they were – despite popular belief, it’s more probably that they were in the Western or Eastern wings, rather than somewhere in the Great Tower.
Truth be told, Mary and her entourage were at Craigmillar Castle so frequently that the locals began to nickname adjacent village ‘Little France’ – a name which persists to today. You might be wondering where the ‘French’ reference comes from. Well, remember that the vast majority of Mary’s courtiers were French. She was a Catholic monarch (whereas England was turning Protestant), and she was therefore closely allied to the Roman Catholic European powers of the period.
Life wasn’t easy for Mary. In 1567, she was abducted, allegedly raped and then forced by the Scottish nobility to abdicate as Queen of Scotland, handing the throne to her one year old son, James.
Truth be told, Mary and her entourage were at Craigmillar Castle so frequently that the locals began to nickname adjacent village ‘Little France’ – a name which persists to today. You might be wondering where the ‘French’ reference comes from. Well, remember that the vast majority of Mary’s courtiers were French. She was a Catholic monarch (whereas England was turning Protestant), and she was therefore closely allied to the Roman Catholic European powers of the period.
I hope you enjoy reading it was too long it cut off here…

Credit music to:ebunny celitic morning by Genre music,
credit music:Esther Garcia celtic spirit by Genre music.



Fuente – Source

Craigmillar castle in Edinburgh Scotland part:1 this video is 19 minutes.

EN.- Urban exploration is usually about exploring areas away from urban centers, industrial zones, or abandoned areas. But also for ancient ruins and areas impossible to access, everything depends on each explorer.

ES.- La exploración urbana normalmente se trata de la exploración de zonas alejadas de los núcleos urbanos, zonas industriales, o abandonadas. Pero también por ruinas antiguas y zonas imposibles de acceder, todo depende de cada explorador.

Urbexvideos.eu es la exploración urbana llevada a tu pantalla ! Disfruta de todos los videos de Urbex que existen en una misma página web y todo categorizado por zonas !

Saludos exploradores ! 😉

Publicado en Scotland y etiquetado , , , , , , , .

Deja un comentario

Tu dirección de correo electrónico no será publicada. Los campos obligatorios están marcados con *